Category: world war ii

The Mexican Expeditionary Air Force

The Mexican Expeditionary Air Force

from The History Guy: History Deserves to be Remembered

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Indian Army recruitment poster, World War II.

Color photographs of Sweden taken by Fredrik D…

Color photographs of Sweden taken by Fredrik Daniel Bruno in the 1940s.

Operation Cowboy and the 1945 Rescue of Europe…

Operation Cowboy and the 1945 Rescue of Europe’s Stolen Horses

from The History Guy: History Deserves to be Remembered

Tanks of the Rising Sun Part IV, Interesting T…

In case you missed: Intro, Part I, Part II, Part III

In the previous post I detailed the two workhorse tanks of the IJA, the light and medium tank that made up the bulk of Japan’s armored forces. As a result of being the most numerous tanks available, there were a number of special variants that arose out of the Type 95 and Type 97. Here are just a handful.

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During World War II the Japanese created a handful of amphibious tank and vehicle designs. The most numerous was the Type 2 Ka Mi, which was essentially a Type 95 light tank with a boat like hull and a pair of pontoons for flotation. Despite being the most common Japanese amphibious tank, only 182 were produced between 1942 and 1943.

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The Type 95 So Ki was an especially interesting variant of the Type 95, being an armored railcar. The So Ki featured both tracks and wheels, the wheels allowing it to run on rail tracks, and the tracks allowing it to run off road. The So Ki was also stripped of all weapons, with a number of weapons ports being added for soldiers to fire small arms from. Between 121 to 135 were produced, most of which were used to patrol railroads in Manchuria and Burma.

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The Type 95 Ri Ki was a special crane vehicle built on the chassis of the Type 95 light tank. During any military campaign it’s not uncommon for tanks to become stuck in mud, experience mechanical breakdowns, or be knocked out. Thus the Ki Ri was created to move disabled tanks and conduct other engineering tasks.

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One of the major complaints of the Type 95 was that it’s turret was too small, it’s cramped space greatly reducing crew efficiency. As a solution the IJA came up with the Type 95 Ke-Nu conversion, which was basically a Type 95 with it’s turret replaced with a Type 97’s turret. The Ke-Nu featured a 57mm low velocity gun which was used primarily for infantry support. The Ke-Nu was not produced on it’s own but were conversions of existing tanks. Around 100 such conversions were made.

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The Type 98 Ke-Ni was intended as a replacement of the Type 95. The Type 98 was built upon the chassis of the Type 95, but featured thicker armor, a better engine, better transmission, and a better hull layout. While it’s armor was thicker than the Type 95, it was not thick enough for World War II standards. Thus it was decided that the Type 98 project be scrapped and it’s resources re-directed to other projects. Only 104 Type 98 light tanks were produced between 1943 and 1944.

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The Ho-Ni was inspired by self propelled guns used by Germany, more specifically the Marder series. Using the Type 97 chassis, the Ho Ni came in three models, the Ho-Ni I featured a 75mm anti tank gun in an open casemate, the Ho-Ni II featured a 105mm howitzer, and the Ho-Ni III featured a 75mm anti tank gun in a closed casemate. 26, 54, and 41 were produced of each model respectively.

Soviet infantry in battle, 1942, World War II.

Soviet infantry in battle, 1942, World War II.

The Extraordinary Voyage of the Polish Submari…

The Extraordinary Voyage of the Polish Submarine Orzel

from The History Guy: History Deserves to be Remembered

Australian soldiers at Bougainville, World War…

Australian soldiers at Bougainville, World War II.

Rare British Special Operations Executive push…

Rare British Special Operations Executive push dagger, World War II.

from Helios Auctions

German 7.5cm light infantry gun, World War II.

German 7.5cm light infantry gun, World War II.