Category: saber

US Model 1850 Foot Officer’s Sword

US Model 1850 Foot Officer’s Sword

Housed at Fort Mackinac, Mackinac Island, Michigan.

US Army Presentation Sword, c.1850-1870

US Army Presentation Sword, c.1850-1870

Housed at Fort Mackinac, Mackinac Island, Michigan.

United States Starr Contract Cavalry Sword, Ea…

United States Starr Contract Cavalry Sword, Early 19th Century

Housed at Fort Mackinac, Mackinac Island, Michigan. 

Regular

British Infantry Hanger (c.1750-80), Officer’s Gorget, and Powder Horn at Fort Mackinac

Antique French Sword Sizes Compared

Antique French Sword Sizes Compared

Toledo Bladed Sabre with Steel Hilt – French…

Toledo Bladed Sabre with Steel Hilt – French 1882 Variant

This is a rare variant of a French model 1882 Infantry Officers sabre, with a reinforced steel hilt, and a toledo style sabre blade with a reinforced forte for enhanced parrying.

The toledo blade style features one wide central fuller flanked by two narrow fullers, and makes the edge thicker, preventing damage when parrying. It also makes swords that are very stiff for their weight.

This sword is short, and lightweight (590 grams, 91cm), and was thus likely a levy weight or piquet weight sword.

This sabre is a true sabre under both British definitions, having a curved blade, and French definitions, which go by hilt design.

It was made by Francois Backes and Francois Delacour in Paris.

victoriansword: Indian Tulwar with Complex Hil…

victoriansword:

Indian Tulwar with Complex Hilt, 18th or 19th Century

The single-edged watered steel blade of curved form, impressed mark near forte, the steel hilt with button quillons, open triangular outer-guard pierced with two gold-damascened ducks at the base and rising to a stylised duck’s head finial, curved tapering knuckle-guard with duck head finial, compressed spherical pommel with bud-shaped finial on a petalled mount, decorated in gold overlay with floral sprays and bands containing flower heads, undulating vines and chevron designs. 95 cm long.

Antique Leather Restoration – Sword Scabbard…

Antique Leather Restoration – Sword Scabbards, Belts & Other Leather Military Items

My preferred antique leather product is Pecard Antique Leather Dressing. It is very easy to find (or order) in the US.

Why an Obsolete Sword Design from 1845 was R…

Why an Obsolete Sword Design from 1845 was Reintroduced in 1915

This is a model 1845/55 French infantry officers sabre. It was produced in chatellerault in 1915.

Officially, the 1845/55 pattern was replaced by the 1882 pattern. However due to the war, the French decided to start producing the 45’s again as they already had tooling for that. As a result, some 30,000 of these were made during WWI.

The hilt is gilt Arco, an alloy of copper, charcoal and zinc, potentially also tin. It has a distinctive reddish appearance under the gilding. The 1882 used a “German silver” alloy for the guard – also a copper alloy.

The blade is plain steel (without a nickel coating) – unlike the 1882 which is nickel coated.

It features one broad fuller and one narrow fuller on each side. The 1882 has offset fullers.

British Flank / Light Infantry Officers Sabr…

British Flank / Light Infantry Officers Sabre, 1796 to 1803

This is a British interim sabre from between 1796 and 1803, for a Flank or Light Infantry officer. With a wedge section blade, heavily curved, and a 1796 style hilt, this sword was scaled down to fit the needs of an infantry officer and is extremely quick and agile.

The deeply curved, slightly shorter blade is well suited to draw cuts, and the overall lightness compliments the POB (12cm from crossguard)

The reason it can be accurately dated to the interim period of 1796 to 1803 is because of the British war office officially adopting new patterns of sabres in those years.

In 1796 the (rather well known) 1796 light cavalry sabre was adopted, which this mimics in hilt design, featuring a stirrup hilt (“P” shaped guard) and a curved blade.

Flank infantry and Light infantry officers often engaged in skirmishing tactics and thus officers for these regiments tended to go for more combat appropriate swords than their official pattern (The 1796 spadroon, often considered to be a terrible sword).

As a result of the number of Flank/Light infantry officers using 1796 Light Cavalry sabre derivatives, the 1803 was soon officially adopted for these regiments, featuring a broad, heavily curved blade and a more elaborate and more protective hilt.

This design falls between those two.