Category: saber

victoriansword: British Rifle Volunteers Offic…

victoriansword:

British Rifle Volunteers Officer’s Sword, based on the Pattern 1821 Heavy Cavalry Trooper’s Sword.

British 1821 Rifle Volunteer’s Sword

The bowl hilt is inscribed, ‘W R V’ ( 3rd Battalion,Wells Rifle Volunteers). A strung bugle is inscribed underneath, with a guelphic crown (Prince Albert’s cypher) over the top of this inscription.

I have seen similar swords attributed to the Warwickshire Rifle Volunteers, although I am not sure of the basis for the attribution.

victoriansword: Colonel Probyn and the Office…

victoriansword:

Colonel Probyn and the Officers of the 11th Bengal Cavalry, 1863

This photo illustrates the great diversity in uniforms that could be found in any given cavalry regiment in Indian following the Mutiny in 1857-58. This diversity extends to the swords used by the officers and men. We can see the three-bar hilt of a Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Sword, a “Hindu basket hilt” of a khanda or firangi, “mameluke” hilts, non-regulation “Scinde Horse” pattern hilts (scroll hilts), and hilts that are very similar to Pattern 1796 Cavalry Swords.

British Pattern 1827 Rifle Officer’s Sword An…

British Pattern 1827 Rifle Officer’s Sword

An 1827 Pattern Rifle Officer’s sword by Gardiner & Co, Commercial Road, London. Blade 32". Etching worn. Steel bowl with strung bugle & Victorian Crown. In its steel mounted leather scabbard.

British Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s Sword …

British Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s Sword and an Indian Axe, 19th Century

The first with 81.5 cm blade etched with scrolls, regimental badge of the 1st Madras (European) Regiment, (late 102nd Royal Madras Fusiliers/1st Bn Royal Dublin Fusiliers) and battle honours to Ava, regulation brass gothic hilt, ribbed wood grip [missing shagreen and wire wrap], the second with large head engraved with foliage and standing figures in brass, 13 cm spike, 86 cm overall.

French Mle. 1845 Infantry NCO’s Sword A Frenc…

French Mle. 1845 Infantry NCO’s Sword

A French 1845 model non-commissioned officer’s sword, probably from around WW1. This model of sword was first introduced in 1845 and remained essentially unchanged until after WW1. It was carried by both junior officers and NCOs in the French army and inspired US infantry officer’s swords. In 1855 the leather scabbard was replaced with a steel one, which often leads to these being called the 1855 model sword. At the end of the 19th century the two-ring steel scabbard was changed for a one-ring model and these swords were still in use during WW1, even after the 1882 model was introduced. This example is in quite decent condition – there is some denting to the brass guard and the grip wire has gone. The sword is quite stiff to get into and out of the scabbard for some reason. Other than these factors, the sword is in a good state, with a lovely bright blade, quite solid in the hilt (unusual for French infantry swords!) and the wooden grip intact in nice condition. These are very pleasing swords to hold with a surprising amount of authority in their blades for the size (30 inches).

The Nimcha: Sabre of the Maghreb

The Nimcha: Sabre of the Maghreb: undefined

Indian Army Cavalry Trooper’s Sword, c.1900-19…

Indian Army Cavalry Trooper’s Sword, c.1900-1920

An Indian Army cavalry trooper’s sword from around WW1. This type of sword was originally introduced in around the 1870s (perhaps after the India Arms Act of 1878 forbade Indian companies from making weapons), marrying a 1796 sabre type blade, called the ‘Paget blade’, to an 1821 pattern 3-bar hilt. Most were manufactured in Britain and exported to India (Mole, Thurkle and Wilkinson were the main makers). They were still being used in WW1 and were not replaced with the British 1908 pattern thrusting sword for all Indian cavalry until after the Great War. This model of sword usually features a steel hilt, but this example has a nickel-plated brass hilt, which makes me think that either it was wartime economy (as will many artillery officers’ swords) or the hilt was made locally in India. The blade has some light pitting in some areas, but is in reasonable condition structurally. It is solid in the hilt without movement. The nickel-brass hilt is in quite good condition, though could benefit from cleaning, and the shagreen of the grip is in good condition – with no grip wire though.

Short Biography: Johann Justus Runkel (1751-18…

Short Biography: Johann Justus Runkel (1751-1808) – Importer of Swords: undefined

British Pattern 1857 Engineers Officer’s Sword…

British Pattern 1857 Engineers Officer’s Sword

A Victorian Volunteer Engineers officer’s sword, retailed by Hebbert.

Antique Sword Unboxing – January 2018

Antique Sword Unboxing – January 2018