Category: saber

victoriansword: A River Tyne Police Hanger …

victoriansword:

A River Tyne Police Hanger and companion truncheon

The first by “Parker, Field & Sons, 233 Holborn, London”, both circa 1870,
the first with curved fullered blade double-edged towards the point, the back-edge fitted with spring-catch at the forte, etched with maker’s details in full on one side and “Tyne River Police” on the other, regulation brass hilt, and ribbed fishskin-covered grip, in original brass-mounted scabbard, the locket with frog-stud (locking button missing), 58cm blade, the truncheon painted in polychrome and gilt with crown and cipher over a red ground cartouche, inscribed “River Tyne Police” over a natural ribbed handle, stamped to terminal, “Field 59, Leman Ste.”, 44cm.

victoriansword: A Set of British Pattern 1827…

victoriansword:

A Set of British Pattern 1827 Rifle Officers’ Swords

A Pair of Rifle Officer’s Swords Owned by The Hon. G.O.M. Bridgeman

The first of field weight with 82cm blade by Henry WIlkinson Pall Mall London, numbered 15410 for 1867, etched with scrolls, crowned VR cypher, a slung bugle horn, owner’s crest and W.S. to G.B. within a banner, regulation steel gothic patent solid hilt incorporating slung bugle horn, wire bound chequered horn grips, in its steel scabbard with two suspension rings, the second of levee weight with 82.5cm blade by Wilkinson, Pall Mall London, numbered 15439 for 1867 etched with scrolls, crowned VR cypher, a slung bugle horn and owner’s crest, regulation steel gothic hilt incorporating a slung bugle horn, wire bound fish skin grip, in its steel scabbard with two suspension rings.

FOOTNOTES

The Swords of The Honourable Gerald Orlando Manners Bridgeman, 3rd son of the 3rd Earl of Bradford, born 5th November 1847, and died 14th April 1870, aged 22. Ensign The Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort’s Own).
The W.S. on the blade refers to Lord Walter Scott, The Duke of Buccleuch.

victoriansword: An Extremely Fine Rifle Off…

victoriansword:

An Extremely Fine Rifle Officer’s Presentation Sword

83cm blade by J. & W. Wood, Cutlers, Manchester, finely etched with foliage, stands of arms, crowned VR cypher, the Arms of Stockport, slung bugle horn, Prince of Wales feathers, recipient’s crest and arms and presentation inscription, the gilt patent solid hilt, the guard cast and pierced with foliage, Prince of Wales feathers, the unit title of The Stockport Rifle Volunteers Fourth Battn Cheshire, around the Arms of Stockport, the Royal cypher, a slung bugle horn and the recipient’s crest, the back-piece cast with laurels, oak leaves and acorns and a classical helmet, wire bound chequered horn grips, in its gilt scabbard with large gilt mounts embossed with foliage and panels of trophies of arms against a stippled matted ground, two suspension rings, complete with its blue and gold bullion sword and knot.

The inscriptions reads: Presented to Major Coppock, By His Late Company The First Stockport or XVIIth Cheshire Rifle Volunteers, May 4th 1861.
HENRY COPPOCK appointed Captain when the 17th (Stockport) Company was formed 10 March 1860. Upon the formation of the 4th Administrative Battalion, Cheshire Rifle Volunteers 20 November 1860, he was appointed Major (though with a Captain’s rank), a position he held until his death in 1870.

He was born in 1806 in Stockport and became a lawyer. Upon the formation of Stockport Borough in 1835 he was appointed Town Clerk, and served the town through the troubled times of the Chartists Riots and other insurrections.

He fathered 12 children and resided at Daw Bank House, Stockport. He died in 1870. His ‘family’ arms/crest appear to be his own invention. The Arms for Stockport as shown on the sword are still in use, though they were not Granted until 1932.

British Pattern 1827 Rifle Officer’s Sword

British Pattern 1827 Rifle Officer’s Sword

The blade is etched “SURREY RIFLES”–a volunteer rifles unit.

Italian Sword and Helmet of a Senior Cavalry O…

Italian Sword and Helmet of a Senior Cavalry Officer, Late 19th Century

Kingdom of Italy, Sabre adapted in 1873, with wide, slightly curved, single-and false-edged blade, with a small fuller that doubles in the last third, first part engraved with Savoy eagle, trophies and floral motifs on a dark ground, tang marked ‘DITTA SARDI E. E FIGLIO TORINO’; iron hilt with guard with bands, long cap, checkered at the base and smooth, ebony grip. Nickel-plated scabbard with two suspension rings. Complete with clutches and sword-knot.The helmet with smooth, iron skull, brass crest, carved with floral motifs in bass-relief on the sides, a lion’s head in the front part, a crowned monogram ‘U’ at he medallions base; black fur (small parts missing) with iron cross in the center, brass border, leather chin-strap covered with scales decorated in bass-relief, a cockade on the left side. Internal part in leather and cloth. length 98 cm.

A Group of French Military Swords, 19th-20th C…

A Group of French Military Swords, 19th-20th Century

France, One cavalry sabre Mod. 1822, marked St. Etienne, with iron scabbard. One similar, mod. 1822, with Coulaux in Klingenthal signature on the back, iron scabbard and leather sword-knot. Two sabres Mod. 1845, one with date 1861 and iron scabbard, one without scabbard. Two sabres model 1882, both with scabbard. One Coulaux in Klingethal sword with monogram ‘PS’ on the cap, iron scabbard and leather sword-knot. Two officer’s swords, one of 1830, with rooster emblem, one of about 1860 with scabbard. Length 91-109.5 cm. 

Curved swords and how to cut with them – kil…

Curved swords and how to cut with them – kilij, shamshir, tulwar, sabre

Hanger, 18th Century

Hanger, 18th Century

This elegant ‘hanger’ probably dates from the mid-1700s and likely had a naval heritage—shorter swords like this being more effective weapons for fighting in the confined spaces of warships. Bone grips are also associated with service within the famous East India Company.

Two identical stamps can be found on the blade, one on either side, which I haven’t been able to identify. The three fullers suggest a German origin for the blade but overall the design is similar to some of the naval hangers made by the famous Birmingham sword-maker Samuel Harvey. The blade is still relatively sharp and ends in a nice clipped point, an uncommonly found feature. The stirrup-hilt has a more pleasing shape to it than most of its stablemates, being waisted across the crossguard.

victoriansword: British Officer’s Sabre, c.180…

victoriansword:

British Officer’s Sabre, c.1800

This pattern 1796 style sabre was popular with officers of infantry regiments, the Royal Navy, and the yeomanry and the militia. Without decoration or markings it is impossible to say with certainty which arm of the military used this particular example. 

British Pattern 1857 Royal Engineers Officer’s…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1857 Royal Engineers Officer’s Sword