Category: royal armouries

victoriansword: Centrefire four-barrelled L…

victoriansword:

Centrefire four-barrelled Large Frame Holster Model Thorn patent pistol by Charles Lancaster, circa 1881

Description

A.A.Thorn Patent oval bore single trigger four barrel pistol. The single-trigger action operates a rotating firing-pin. A side lever operates a dolls head barrel lock on the top of the frame (known as a 1st type locking latch). Plain finish with much original bluing stamped with Birmingham proof marks. The square shaped chequered walnut butt has provision for a rod butt extension and a lanyard-loop. The hinged barrels are bored with Charles Lancaster’s patent oval bores and have open-sights and a German silver foresight. The barrel cluster is fitted with a self-acting extractor star. The assembly number, 22, is stamped on the bottom of the frame.

Notes

In 1878, the firm of Charles Lancaster Gunmakers, previously run by C.W. Lancaster who died in that year, was acquired by Henry A.A. Thorn from his widow. In 1881 Thorn patented an action for two and four barrel guns, he would subsequently use this patent in the manufacture of both shotgun/rifles and pistols. 

The pistols were designed to take a variety of calibres, but in the main they would be for the four barrel pistol .455 and .476 government cartridges and for the two barrel pistol the .577 short Snider or Boxer, they were also fitted with Lancaster’s oval bore rifling.

In all about 712 four barrel pistols and about 234 two barrel versions were produced between 1882 and 1897.

This is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, known examples of Lancaster’s four barreled pistols.

Measurements

Overall Length 11 in.

Overall Length 279 mm

Overall Weight 1.085 kg

Barrel Length 6.25 in.

Barrel Length 160 mm

Calibre .455 in

© Royal Armouries

victoriansword: British Pattern 1859 Cutlass B…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1859 Cutlass Bayonet with “Verney’s Catch”

Heavy steel bowl guard with fixing for the bayonet bar and slot for Verney’s scabbard catch. The grip is formed of two scales of pressed chequered leather secured by four pins. The blade is slightly curved and is unfullered. The tip is sharpened on both sides, the back being 12.5 in (318mm) long.
The lether scabbard has polished steel chape and scabbard mouth. Verney’s spring catch is fixed to the left side of the scabard. On the right side is the frog stud.

The catch design was proposed by Lieut. Verney, RN and approved for fitting in the List of Changes (para. 369) on 19 September 1861. This example is likely to be the sealed pattern version. The blade was made in Solingen and accepted as such, the likely maker was Weyersberg Bros.

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victoriansword: “Welsh knife” of the 9th Batta…

victoriansword:

“Welsh knife” of the 9th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, c.1917-18

Of steel with flat oval pommel, pierced by two holes, for the wrist cord (which it retains) with the pointed angular end of the tang projecting beyond; wide tang to serve as the grip (retaining its cord binding); stepped disc hand-guard which can be folded flat.

The broad, double-edged, leaf-shaped blade with a flattened central ‘ridge’ for the last 335 mm (13.2 in.). The ricasso of the blade bears the engraved motto DROS URDDAS CYMRU.

The scabbard has a full width brown leather belt-loop extending from the inside of the mouth and the scabbard itself appears to be made of a cross-woven fabric over card, the whole covered in khaki canvas webbing, with a brown leather chape.

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Iron Mask  17th or 18th Century

Iron Mask  17th or 18th Century

Possibly from a scold’s bridle or mask of infamy. A scold’s bridle was an instrument of punishment, as a form of torture and public humiliation. The device was an iron muzzle in an iron framework that enclosed the head. A bridle-bit (or curb-plate), about 2 inches long and 1 inch broad, projected into the mouth and pressed down on top of the tongue. 

The mask of infamy was a torture device used as a form of humiliation. The mask itself caused no physical torture, but the wearer was often chained to a post where he or she was tortured by various members surrounding the scene. The mask would sometimes have a ball, or other type of inner device, to prevent the wailing or screaming of the wearer. The types of masks represented the crime. For example, if the person was considered dirty, he or she would wear the pig shaped mask. It would be locked onto the head for a time determined by the accuser. 

This item was originally displayed as an executioner’s mask alongside a block and axe in the Tower of London.

Arms & Armour (The Journal of the Royal Armour…

Arms & Armour (The Journal of the Royal Armouries): 15th Anniversary Collection:

Indian Khanjar, Lahore, 18th CenturyThe blade …

Indian Khanjar, Lahore, 18th Century

The blade is double edged and double curved with a medial ridge on each side and a slightly reinforced point. At the top of the blade on each side is a panel of gold koftgari, one side being more geometric than the other. The hilt is of ivory with rather stylised flowers carved on the quillon block. The block extends on each side and terminates in small bud shaped knops. Above the quillons is a carved collar of eight panels, each enclosing a sytylised flowering plant. The grip is octagonal and plain. The pommel, made of a separate piece, is carved as a lion’s head with the mouth stained red. The scabbard is of wood covered in red velvet and fitted with a gilded chape.

Dimensions: The length of the blade is 220 mm, the overall length of the knife being 330 mm, the length of the scabbard being 268 mm. Weight: The weight of the knife is 0.182 kg, the weight of the scabbard being 0.036 kg.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1859 Cutlass …

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1859 Cutlass Bayonet with “Verney’s Catch”

Heavy steel bowl guard with fixing for the bayonet bar and slot for Verney’s scabbard catch. The grip is formed of two scales of pressed chequered leather secured by four pins. The blade is slightly curved and is unfullered. The tip is sharpened on both sides, the back being 12.5 in (318mm) long.
The lether scabbard has polished steel chape and scabbard mouth. Verney’s spring catch is fixed to the left side of the scabard. On the right side is the frog stud.

The catch design was proposed by Lieut. Verney, RN and approved for fitting in the List of Changes (para. 369) on 19 September 1861. This example is likely to be the sealed pattern version. The blade was made in Solingen and accepted as such, the likely maker was Weyersberg Bros.

Blade Length 26.75inches
Blade Length 680mm
Blade Width 1.5inches
Blade Width 38mm
Scabbard Length 28.75inches
Scabbard Length 730mm
Scabbard Weight 0.34kg
Overall Length 32.5inches
Overall Length 825mm
Bayonet Weight 1.095kg
Combined Weight 1.43kg

Pattern 1908 cavalry sword | Royal Armouries

Pattern 1908 cavalry sword | Royal Armouries: undefined

victoriansword: Sword – Cavalry sword, expe…

victoriansword:

Sword – Cavalry sword, experimental Pattern B, 1905 (1905)

The desire of committee members Colonel Napier and Captain Hutton to keep a cut and thrust sword saw wider trials in 1905. This sword is based on the Pattern 1899 with the addition of a thumb opening to control the blade via the back edge. Unsurprisingly it was found totally impractical in trials.

© Royal Armouries

victoriansword: Experimental Cavalry Sword, M…

victoriansword:

Experimental Cavalry Sword, Modeled on the Pattern 1899 Cavalry Trooper’s Sword

This is an early attempt to improve upon the Pattern 1899. It retains the 1899 blade but the hilt modifications have slightly improved the overall balance. It has a new type of hilt, with a thicker, flanged guard and a slightly cocked, flattened grip with a small thumb depression for thrusting.

Modelled on that of the 1899 Pattern sword, having a sheet steel bowl guard, the portion closest to the blade having a flanged rim (unlike the 1899 pattern which has a plain rim to the guard). Grip of wood, cut with a coarse diamond shaped chequering and heavily lacquered or varnished which shows shrinkage and flaking on close examination. On the back face of the grip, close to the hilt, a small portion is removed to form a slight depression as a thumb rest. A narrow steel/iron ferrule is fitted at the end closest to the blade. Pommel of steel/iron, of heavy, bulbous form and having a long projecting beak which follows the curvature of the guard where it joins the pommel. The outside face of the pommel is cut with diamond shaped chequering. A slot for a sword knot is cut through the narrow portion of the guard and the elongated beak of the pommel. Single edged blade, spear pointed and slightly curved and having a wide fuller each side. The cutting edge side of the blade, close to the guard, steps outwards to form a shoulder on which the guard is seated. It appears to be the 1899 Pattern blade, and is actually dated as such on the back edge close to the hilt. It also carries the date of 1901 in abbreviated form. 

Scabbard is of the same general form that appeared with the 1882 Pattern sword and subsequent variants in so far it is of sheet steel folded and brazed together at the front edge, and is fitted with two fixed suspension rings on front and back edges just below the mouth. The mouthpiece itself is a separate item, fitting over the scabbard body and secured by two screws through the edges. The mouth itself is markedly flared. The mouthpiece is dated 1894 and has markings indicating a Royal Artillery association. A heavy protective shoe is also fitted.