Category: regency

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British Sword, Early 19th Century

A MAMELUKE-HILTED OFFICER’S SWORD RETAILED BY GILL, PRINCE’S STREET, SOHO, LONDON, EARLY 19TH CENTURY
with pipe-backed blade formed with a spear point, etched on one face ‘Gill’s warranted’ within an oval, gilt-brass hilt decorated with a finely punched ground, comprising a pair of flat langets swelling towards the terminals, back-strap, and a pair of horn grip-scales retained by three pairs of gilt-brass rivets with circular washers (one missing) and the pommel pierced for a knot, in its gilt-brass scabbard with two large mounts formed as expanded flower heads, each fitted with a ring for suspension, signed on the locket, and with some early gilding throughout. 85.5 cm; 33 5/8 in blade.

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British Pattern 1805 Naval Officer’s Sword

By Shrapnall, 61 Charing Cross, Early 19th Century. The blade etched and gilt against a blued ground on one side with post-1801 crowned royal arms and mottoes between trophies and foliage, and on the other with crowned ‘GR’ cypher between an agricultural trophy and foliage, the back with bladesmith’s name ‘J.J. Runkel, Soligen’ (grip with minor chip), in original black leather scabbard (split beneath the suspension mount, worn overall) with linear engraved gilt mounts and D-rings for suspension, the locket signed in full on one side and with frog-stud on the other, and retaining much original gilding. 82.5 cm blade.

Provenance:

Probably carried by the 7th Earl of Northesk during his naval career.

James Shrapnell is recorded at 61 Charing Cross between 1774 and 1808.

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A fold-out version of the Infantry (and Cavalry) Sword Exercise, published in Manchester, Great Britain, 1822.

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British Saw Back Pioneer’s Sword, 19th Century

Wide, slightly curved, single-and false-edged blade with saw-back and mark above the tang; mono-quillon, solid brass hilt with pommel shaped as lion’s head, opening for a sword knot. length 67 cm.

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A Bengal Horse Artillery Officer`s Full Dress uniform circa 1830

And a Pattern 1821 Artillery Officer’s Sword.

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13th Light Dragoons Officers; 1814, 1844, 1839, 1835 by Reginald Augustus Wymer

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Pattern 1820 1st Life Guards Trooper’s Sword

95.5cm blade, regulation steel hilt with bowl guard engraved and pierced with crown over the regimental cypher, the border decorated with 12 brass studs (one missing), wire bound fish skin grip (wire binding A/F), in its steel scabbard, complete with buff leather sword knot.

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British Mameluke-Hilted Officer’s Sabre Of Brigadier General Hugh Halkett, Early 19th Century

By Brunn, Sword Cutler To The Prince Regent, 56 Charing Cross, London, circa 1818. With bright curved blade double-edge at the point in front of the yelman, faintly etched and gilt over half its length on one side with foliage and crowned ‘GR’ cypher over the standing figure of Britannia and a wreath of laurel, and on the other with a martial trophy and foliage representing the Union, steel-mounted hilt including guard with copper rose-head on each side, ivory grips secured by two brass rivets each with copper floret-shaped heads, and pommel with brass-lined piercing for a sword-knot, in original copper-mounted steel scabbard with two brass rings for suspension, the mouth on one side engraved ‘Br. General Halkett’ in script beneath the maker’s details (minor scattered pitting). 80 cm blade.

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An Officer’s Room

This hand coloured engraving of An Officers Room was published by McCleary of 39 Nassau Street, Dublin. The print shows three young army officers of the 7th Hussars relaxing in their room. The sabretache and spurs, racing, hunting and trap prints on the wall fits in with them being cavalry officers. It paints a picture of an easy life with one officer laying on a couch, smoking a long Meerschaum pipe whilst reading the promotions in a gazette, another playing the flute and a third warming himself in front of the fire whist admiring his reflection in the mirror. Boxing gloves, fishing and shooting gear and a bat and ball are shown; there are two bottles of claret on the table with a knocked over glass; uniform is strewn across the room with two puppies pulling a jacket and trousers with the boots and spurs lying across a stool with a bootjack. It was not unusual for a man to wear a corset in this period and it perhaps points to either the officers’ vanity or a previous liaison. Dublin had the largest army barracks in Europe at this period and officers would have been a common sight in the city. McCleary pokes fun at the seemingly carefree life of the wealthy young officer. William McCleary was one of the two major print publishers and dealers at the turn of 1800 in Dublin and produced both political images and satire. He also had a reputation for plagiarizing the work of London printers as well as his city rival J. Sidebotham which caused a very public falling out between the two. His premises were first in Lower Ormond Quay in the 1790s before his success allowed him to move to fashionable Nassau Street. He was first at number 21 before moving to 32 and then 39 in 1820, which is the address on this print. The 1850 Dublin City Directory shows the firm still to be in business at 24 Nassau Street. McCleary was a successful, if not sharp, businessman and it’s amusing to see that he even adds one of his broadsheets to the wall advertising McCleary’s List of Prints Pub’d and sold at No. 39 Nassau St. The print is in a period ebonised and gilt frame. Circa 1825.

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British Pattern 1822 Infantry Officer’s Sword Combined with a Pistol

An interesting combination of a regulation officer’s sword and a pistol. This example was made or retailed by Johnston of Newcastle Street, London.