Category: jewelry

Greek Gold  Earrings with Goddess Motifs, 4th …

Greek Gold  Earrings with Goddess Motifs, 4th Century BC

A pair of gold earrings with central shield decorated with bead wire to the edges; within each shield a series of loops bordered by bead wire; to the center a rosette consisting of four layers of petals with concave centers and with bead wire edges, with central bead; to the edge of each shield a series of heart-shaped leaves and two layer rosettes with acanthus leaf ornament to the center; from each smaller rosette a miniature figure of a goddess with hands to breasts and wearing a sheath dress; from the central acanthus leaf is an inverted pyramid pendant with miniature rosettes to each corner and bead wire edge with loops below; to each face of the pyramid a palmette motif in bead wire; granule beads to the base of each pyramid; from each of the heart-shaped leaves on the shield a loop in loop chain joined at the bottom by a rosette from which hangs a ribbed seed-like pendant; wire loop to the back. 29.93 grams total, 65mm (2 ½")

Disc and pyramid earrings are widely found throughout the Greek world: in addition to the East Greek examples, they have been discovered in the North Pontic region, on Cyprus, in Greece and in South Italy. The East Greek jewelers seem to have been particularly fond of pendants in the form of Nikai, Erotes and female figures.

The small pendant images on this earring bear similarities to motifs associated with the so called ‘bee goddess’ that was popular in Asia Minor and referred to as “The Pure Mother Bee”  in ancient Greece. Honey was regarded as an elixir in Mediterranean societies; a magic potion that ensured a long and healthy life. In addition to being an elixir, honey was a healing substance with a variety of medicinal uses due to its antiseptic qualities.

Very Rare Medieval Gold Signet Ring with a Bas…

Very Rare Medieval Gold Signet Ring with a Basilisk, 15th-16th Century AD

A substantial D-section gold hoop with discoid bezel, bilinear incised border surrounding a regardant basilisk with staff. 17 grams, 24mm overall, 20.55mm internal diameter.

According to mythology, a basilisk is a legendary reptile reputed to be King of serpents and said to have the power to cause death with a single glance. In Medieval Europe, the description of the creature began taking on features from cockerels.

Egyptian Carnelian Bead and Pendant Necklace, …

Egyptian Carnelian Bead and Pendant Necklace, Third Intermediate Period, 1070-664 BC

A restrung necklace of carnelian oval and rounded beads with alternating heart and Djed amulets of graduating size. 43cm (17")

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Sweetheart jewelry

Viking Bronze Bracelets With Intricate Detail…

Viking Bronze Bracelets With Intricate Details, 9th-10th Century AD

Two bracelets: one approximately 3 inches long
and 2.6 inches in diameter; the other is approximately 3.1 inches long
and 2.8 inches in diameter. Matching hand-stamped design work, each made
from a single sheet of bronze. Likely for a young woman.

Roman Gold Ring with Vulcan Intaglio, 2nd-3rd …

Roman Gold Ring with Vulcan Intaglio, 2nd-3rd Century AD

Inset carnelian cloison with intaglio image of a standing robed armorer (Vulcan?) with a hammer, working on a Corinthian-type helmet.

Rare Renaissance Gold and Type IIA Diamond Rin…

Rare Renaissance Gold and Type IIA Diamond Ring, 16th-17th Century AD

A slender D-section gold hoop with graduated rosettes to the shoulders, scrolls supporting a cupped bezel with egg-and-dart modeling to the rim, open to the underside; inset baguette-cut Type IIa ‘first water’ diamond; engraved areas were once enameled black as was customary for that period, trace enamel in extant. 3.78 grams, 23mm overall, 16.04mm internal diameter. Rare.

The stone was sourced from the Golconda mines, Hyderabad, India, which ceased production in 1725. It was subjected to analysis at EGL USA in New York in October 2016 and certified ‘Type IIA and not treated’. Type II diamonds have no nitrogen impurities. Type IIa diamonds comprise 1-2% of all natural diamonds; they are often entirely devoid of impurities and are usually colorless. The underside of the ring’s bezel was probably cut away in the 19th century to improve the appearance of the stone.

At the time of its cutting, the diamond would have been described as a ‘diamond of the first water’, a reference to its perfect clarity. The term went out of use for defining the color, clarity and internal cleanliness of diamonds when newer, more scientific grading systems came into use. Golconda stones of this purity are very rare.

Massive Dome-Shaped 24 Karat Gold Ring of Unkn…

Massive Dome-Shaped 24 Karat Gold Ring of Unknown Origin, C. 2000-1000 BC

In the style of Mycenae. 48.4 grams, ring size 6-7

Roman Ring with Portrait of Hadrian, 2nd Centu…

Roman Ring with Portrait of Hadrian, 2nd Century AD

A
silver ring with D-section hoop widening at the shoulder; oval bezel
engraved with a portrait of the Emperor Hadrian wearing a laurel wreath.
12 grams, 22.27mm overall, 18.53mm internal diameter

Greek Dolphin Pendant 5th-3rd Century BC

Greek Dolphin Pendant

5th-3rd Century BC

A hollow-formed silver dolphin figurine in leaping pose. 2.13 grams, 29mm (1 ¼")