Category: india

A little assemblage of Indian weapons that could have been used in the war of 1857-8, including an HEIC percussion musket as used by many Indian sepoys, two hide dhal (shields) and a basket hilted firanghi sword (probably circa 1800 in origin, but they were still shown in use in the 1850s).

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2nd Punjab Infantry on Gym Day

A splendid photo from around 1890, showing men of the 2nd Punjab Infantry, with fencing bayonets, gymnasium sabres and Indian clubs in a great variety of sizes. Also note the singlesticks, fencing helmets and sporans for protecting the groin. These chaps look hard as nails!

Various Indo-Persian Daggers

Nine 20th Century Indo-Persian daggers. There are various types of dagger here, including some famous types: the pesh kabz, khanjarli and khanjar. The handles are a mixture of wood, bone and horn.

Wootz Katar, Possibly 17th Century

Of robust size and high quality, this venerable Southern Indian katar is perhaps as old as the 1600s. Its blade is held in place by twin elephants, sacred animals, and entirely made of wootz and shows all the beautiful patterns and swirls you’d expect from that mysterious steel.

The hilt has been hand-carved extensively, not just to show floral elements but also zig-zag patterns and hundreds of holes and stars—perforations reminiscent of jali screens.

Despite its centuries of wear this is still a sturdy, historical and aesthetically pleasing piece. It is accompanied by a modern sheath.

Out 10 September in the USA. Based on the quality of his past work, this is a must-read book for me. 

Marketing blurb:

From the bestselling author of Return of a King, the story of how the East India Company took over large swaths of Asia, and the devastating results of the corporation running a country.

In August 1765, the East India Company defeated the young Mughal emperor and set up, in his place, a government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a private army.

The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional company and became something much more unusual: an international corporation transformed into an aggressive colonial power. Over the course of the next 47 years, the company’s reach grew until almost all of India south of Delhi was effectively ruled from a boardroom in the city of London.

The Anarchy tells one of history’s most remarkable stories: how the Mughal Empire-which dominated world trade and manufacturing and possessed almost unlimited resources-fell apart and was replaced by a multinational corporation based thousands of miles overseas, and answerable to shareholders, most of whom had never even seen India and no idea about the country whose wealth was providing their dividends. Using previously untapped sources, Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before and provides a portrait of the devastating results from the abuse of corporate power.

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Indian Jade and Silver Hilt Khanjar, 17th or 18th Century

With slightly curved double-edged blade of finely watered wootz steel with a double-filler over each side forming a narrow medial ridge to the reinforced point, hilt comprising silver quillon-block with pointed langets and downcurved quillons each with stylised makara-head terminal, and faceted grip of light greyish green jade rising up to a beaked rounded pommel, in its wooden scabbard covered in fishskin (minor damage) with silver locket and chape embossed and chased with a repeated design of foliage. 17.2 cm blade.

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Indian Tulwar with Complex Hilt, 18th or 19th Century

The single-edged watered steel blade of curved form, impressed mark near forte, the steel hilt with button quillons, open triangular outer-guard pierced with two gold-damascened ducks at the base and rising to a stylised duck’s head finial, curved tapering knuckle-guard with duck head finial, compressed spherical pommel with bud-shaped finial on a petalled mount, decorated in gold overlay with floral sprays and bands containing flower heads, undulating vines and chevron designs. 95 cm long.

Revolvers & Hunting Knives – Arnachellum & Sons of Salem

Looking at an antique Bowie knife made by Indian maker Arnachellum, and considering where these fit in their historical context.

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Indian Tulwar, 19th Century 

The hilt is of steel with short quillons (tholies), the front one supporting a a knuckle guard (paraj), and a large saucer-shaped pommel (katori). The surface is decorated in gold koftgari with sprays of flowers and foliage and bands of chevron pattern in thick gold outlined in plain steel against a gold ground. The blade is single edged and curved, of watered steel, narrow at the hilt and widening slightly to the point. It has two narrow grooves (mang) close to the rounded spine, a short ricasso, and a bevelled edge. The scabbard is of wood covered with crimson velvet, with a chape and throat of gilt copper. The baldrick is of crimson silk webbing with greem borders and scrolling foliage decoration in gold thread, with a buckle of gilt copper.

Dimensions: length: 87.8 cm (34.5 in), blade length: 75.2 cm (29.6 in) Weight: 1.16 kg (2 lb 9 oz)

© Royal Armouries

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Indian Mutiny and William Hodson Display at the National Army Museum in London