Category: edwardian

Russian prima ballerina, Anna Pavlovna.

Russian prima ballerina, Anna Pavlovna.

victoriansword: Victorian and Boer War Era …

victoriansword:

Victorian and Boer War Era Medical Corps Uniforms and Accouterments

British Pattern 1900 Naval Cutlasses

British Pattern 1900 Naval Cutlasses

With chrome finishes to both, blades are marked Wilkinson and have various markings to the blades, one marked 1903 the other marked 1902.

victoriansword: Kukris!

victoriansword:

Kukris!

victoriansword: The Illustrated London News…

victoriansword:

The Illustrated London News from Saturday, February 22, 1908. This image, more than any other, cemented the reputation of the kukri as a fearsome weapon in the imagination of the western reading public.

victoriansword: Wall Hanging Practice Fencing…

victoriansword:

Wall Hanging Practice Fencing Opponent, Late 19th or Early 20th Century

In the form of a hinged epee and studded padded leather target, 30 cm wide x 84 cm high.

Regulation Pattern British Cavalry Officers’ S…

victoriansword:

There were two patterns of sword used by British cavalry officers during the Victorian era; one pattern for heavy cavalry officers and one pattern for light cavalry officers. 

The Pattern 1821 Heavy Cavalry Officer’s Sword was the regulation sword for combat for officers of heavy cavalry regiments from 1821 to 1912. Heavy cavalry regiments included the three regiments of Household Cavalry, seven regiments of Dragoon Guards, and three regiments of Dragoons for a total of thirteen heavy cavalry regiments. The Household Cavalry regiments had their own unique patterns, but occasionally their officers opted for the standard P1821 Heavy Cavalry Officer’s Sword, so we could potentially narrow down the number of regiments using the P1821 Heavy Cavalry Sword to nine regiments.

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Above: a Pattern 1821 Heavy Cavalry Officer’s Sword c.1850-1860

The Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword was the regulation sword for combat for officers of light cavalry regiments from 1821-1896. There were seventeen light cavalry regiments during our period. In addition to those seventeen regiments in the regular army, there were dozens (39 in 1880) of Yeomanry (essentially militia cavalry) regiments, the vast majority of which were light cavalry. Based on numbers of regiments alone, once can see that there were far more light cavalry officers than heavy cavalry officers, and therefore more P1821 Light Cavalry Officers’ Swords than P1821 Heavy Cavalry Officers’ Swords. Officers of the Royal Artillery and Royal Horse Artillery also carried the P1821 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword, thereby adding to the already large numbers of P1821s manufactured in the 19th century.

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Above: a Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword c.1850-1860

In 1896 the powers that be decided that the light cavalry officer’s sword had insufficient hand protection and decided that officers of light cavalry regiments should adopt the P1821 Heavy Cavalry hilt. At that point officers had a few options–they could re-hilt their current swords with the heavy cavalry pattern hilt, or they could buy completely new swords. It is likely some officers ignored the new regulation and kept their three-bar light cavalry hilts, but most officers would make sure their swords conformed to regulations. With the new regulations of 1896 requiring all cavalry officers to adopt the heavy cavalry hilt, heavy cavalry pattern swords became much more plentiful than they had been prior to 1896. For modern day collectors, this means that post-1896 heavy cavalry officers’ swords are much easier to find on the market than pre-1896 heavy cavalry officers’ swords. Post-1896 cavalry swords are often called the Pattern 1896 Cavalry Officer’s Sword or Pattern 1896 Universal Cavalry Officer’s Sword. Although this pattern was replaced by the Pattern 1912 Cavalry Officer’s Sword, a number of officers chose the P1896 which was still being made throughout the period of the Great War.

It is important to note that throughout the Victorian era, especially in last two or three decades, officers’ swords began to subtly change–most notably grips and blades became straighter. Below is an example of a World War One era Pattern 1896 Cavalry Officer’s Sword.

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Above: a Pattern 1896 Cavalry Officer’s Sword c.1914

These images of Winston Churchill illustrate the change to the regulations. As a newly commissioned officer in 1895, young Winston is wearing a Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword. In 1896 Churchill is pictured wearing a Pattern 1896 Cavalry Officer’s Sword.

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Above: Winston Churchill when he was a 2nd Lieutenant of the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars, 1895. He is holding a Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword.

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Above: Winston Churchill in India, 1896. He is wearing a Pattern 1896 Cavalry Officer’s Sword.

Sword photos from Easton Antique Arms.

The Sword-Lance; an idea that never quite made…

victoriansword:

The Sword-Lance; an idea that never quite made it. From the Journal of the United Service Institution of India, Volume 32 (1903).

Vittorio Matteo Corcos – Princess Evelyne Col…

Vittorio Matteo Corcos –

Princess Evelyne Colonna di Stigliano (detail) -1902

Vittorio Matteo Corcos – Princess Evelyne Col…

Vittorio Matteo Corcos –

Princess Evelyne Colonna di Stigliano (detail) -1902