Category: east india company

victoriansword: Light dragoon pattern shako…

victoriansword:

Light dragoon pattern shako and plume worn by Cornet C Cazenove, 6th Madras Light Cavalry, 1851 ©.

The 6th Cavalry were originally raised in 1799. The British officers of the Madras Army’s Light Cavalry regiments wore a distinctive French grey uniform that had been adopted in 1818. Their shakos, tunics and overalls closely followed the British pattern.

NAM Accession Number

NAM. 1963-09-264-2

Copyright/Ownership

National Army Museum, London

Location

National Army Museum, Study collection

Object URL

http://www.nam.ac.uk/online-collection/detail.php?acc=1963-09-264-2

victoriansword: An Unusual East India Compa…

victoriansword:

An Unusual East India Company Naval Officer’s Sword

82cm pipe backed blade by W.Parker London, etched with scrolling foliage, the East India Company arms and motto (partly erased), copper gilt gothic type hilt with bold lion’s head pommel, the guard applied with the East India Company crest and initials E.I.C. within a wreath in silver, the ferrule embossed with flower heads, inner folding guard, wire bound fish skin grip, in its re-leathered scabbard with engraved brass mounts with two suspension rings, the locket with frog stud.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1796 Light Ca…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Style Officer’s Sword with an Indian Blade, Early 19th Century

The heavy deeply curved 80 cm blade of Indian workmanship cut with shallow double grooves to each side, struck with a single small armourers mark and engraved with a short inscription in Islamic script, copper-gilt hilt, 1796 style knuckle-guard, rounded langets, finely cast and chased pommel in the form of a lions head, faceted back-strap, fish-skin covered grip bound with copper wire.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1822 Infantry …

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1822 Infantry Officer’s Sword for an Officer of the East India Company 

A rare East India Company officer’s sword, based on the British Pattern 1822 Infantry Officer’s Sword. This example is unique because it has a straight double-edged blade rather than the regulation slightly curved pipe-back blade. This blade may be original to the sword, but it possible that it is a later replacement. Here is a similar example but with a pipe-back blade.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1796 Light Ca…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Style Officer’s Sword with an Indian Blade, Early 19th Century

The heavy deeply curved 80 cm blade of Indian workmanship cut with shallow double grooves to each side, struck with a single small armourers mark and engraved with a short inscription in Islamic script, copper-gilt hilt, 1796 style knuckle-guard, rounded langets, finely cast and chased pommel in the form of a lions head, faceted back-strap, fish-skin covered grip bound with copper wire.

Antique Sword Restoration – Bombay Horse Art…

Antique Sword Restoration – Bombay Horse Artillery Sabre Part 1

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Style Offic…

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Style Officer’s Sword with an Indian Blade, Early 19th Century

The heavy deeply curved 80 cm blade of Indian workmanship cut with shallow double grooves to each side, struck with a single small armourers mark and engraved with a short inscription in Islamic script, copper-gilt hilt, 1796 style knuckle-guard, rounded langets, finely cast and chased pommel in the form of a lions head, faceted back-strap, fish-skin covered grip bound with copper wire.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1822 Infantry …

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1822 Infantry Officer’s Sword

Infantry officer’s sword belonging to Colonel James Livingstone, who served in the 18th Bombay Native Infantry until 1833.

When the new pattern of Infantry officers sword for the British Army was introduced in 1822, the East India Company followed suit. On the guard the King’s monogram was replaced by the rampant lion of the Company, and the blade also bore the arms of the Company rather than those of the monarch.

NAM Accession Number 

NAM. 1960-05-92-1

Copyright/Ownership

National Army Museum, London

Location

National Army Museum, Study collection

Object URL

http://www.nam.ac.uk/online-collection/detail.php?acc=1960-05-92-1

An East India Company Mameluke-Hilted Sword …

An East India Company Mameluke-Hilted Sword for the Bombay Light Cavalry, c.1830

Curved 30 inch blade with 11 inch panel etched with East India Company Lion, regimental title, crossed lances, florals and maker’s markings for Prosser of London. Steel-mounted mameluke hilt, the gripscales of horn. Black-painted iron scabbard.

An Officer of the Regiment of (Bombay Horse) Artillery,…

An Officer of the Regiment of (Bombay Horse) Artillery, c.1840

The first troop of Bombay Horse Artillery was raised by the East India Company in 1811. In recognition of its services at Hyderabad in 1843 whilst commanded by Major Thomas Leslie, the troop was designated the 1st or Leslie’s Troop and authorised to bear the device of an eagle on its appointments. In 1862 the Bombay Horse Artillery became part of the Royal Artillery.