Category: dirk

A pair of Japanese naval officers dirks, circa…

A pair of Japanese naval officers dirks, circa 1880′s.

from Thomas Delmar Ltd.

A Victorian Officer’s Dirk for the Hig…

A Victorian Officer’s Dirk for the Highland Light Infantry by Henry Wilkinson

The 11 ½ inch single edged blade with notched spine and etched overall, one side with nine battle honors, the Royal crown and the regimental title, the reverse with 20 battle honors, Corunna through Egypt 1882/Tel-el-Kebir above the maker’s signature. Ebonized wooden grip carved with interlace and set with brass studs, the ferrule and pommel molded with thistles, the pommel mounted with a clear foil-backed stone. Black leather scabbard retaining the original knife and fork, the brass mounts with molded thistle decoration and retaining traces of silver-plated finish; throat applied with brass and silver regimental badge. Belt loop retaining original leather hanger, the front with regimental lace.

Note: The Highland Light Infantry were formed in 1881 from an amalgamation of the 71st and 74th Highland regiments, whose pre-1881 battle honors are found on the blade of this example, as well as the honors from the Egyptian Campaign of 1882.

honestmerchantsailor: qsy-complains-a-lot: vi…

honestmerchantsailor:

qsy-complains-a-lot:

victoriansword:

armthearmour:

An odd naval Dirk with a shell guard and what looks like a triangular blade, British or American, ca. 1800-1820, from the Curator’s Eye Antiques.

I again invoke the knowledge of @victoriansword.

British naval dirks were not regulated until the Victorian period. In the 18th century and early 19th century pretty much anything was an option. There was a great diversity in designs for naval dirks; broad and double-edged, thin and double-edged, curved with one edge, and blades with thrust-oriented cross-sections such as diamond, lenticular/oval, square, rectangular, and less commonly, triangular cross-sections. They also varied in length. Dirks had various grips including ivory, ebony, shagreen, and brass. There were various pommel designs, and quite a few guard types, as well. Guards might be simple quillons, a disk, and knuckbow, quillons with a decorative chain attached to the pommel…. Anything goes when it comes to naval dirks of the Georgian period.

Above: A variety of British naval dirks with straight double edged blades. (source)

Above: A curved and single-edged British naval dirk and a small double-edged naval dirk. (source)

Above: Three British dirks of diverse form. (source)

Above: Here is a British dirk with a wide lenticular cross-section, and it looks similar to a ballock dagger. (source)

Slightly later in the 19th century, in 1833, the French Navy adopted a dirk/dagger with a short blade of triangular cross-section.

Above: French M1833 boarding dagger/dirk (source)

So, yeah, British (and American) naval dirks were pretty diverse in just about every aspect of design.

Check out the online collections of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich to see their large collection of naval dirks.

Note that these last ones were issued to French troops in WW1 around 1915 when trench warfare was being developed but before they pulled cutlers from the frontline.

@carminegalleon dirks are basically just regular daggers but For Sailors

And Scots.

(source)

armthearmour: An odd naval Dirk with a shell g…

armthearmour:

An odd naval Dirk with a shell guard and what looks like a triangular blade, British or American, ca. 1800-1820, from the Curator’s Eye Antiques.

I again invoke the knowledge of @victoriansword.

British naval dirks were not regulated until the Victorian period. In the 18th century and early 19th century pretty much anything was an option. There was a great diversity in designs for naval dirks; broad and double-edged, thin and double-edged, curved with one edge, and blades with thrust-oriented cross-sections such as diamond, lenticular/oval, square, rectangular, and less commonly, triangular cross-sections. They also varied in length. Dirks had various grips including ivory, ebony, shagreen, and brass. There were various pommel designs, and quite a few guard types, as well. Guards might be simple quillons, a disk, and knuckbow, quillons with a decorative chain attached to the pommel…. Anything goes when it comes to naval dirks of the Georgian period.

Above: A variety of British naval dirks with straight double edged blades. (source)

Above: A curved and single-edged British naval dirk and a small double-edged naval dirk. (source)

Above: Three British dirks of diverse form. (source)

Above: Here is a British dirk with a wide lenticular cross-section, and it looks similar to a ballock dagger. (source)

Slightly later in the 19th century, in 1833, the French Navy adopted a dirk/dagger with a short blade of triangular cross-section.

Above: French M1833 boarding dagger/dirk (source)

So, yeah, British (and American) naval dirks were pretty diverse in just about every aspect of design.

Check out the online collections of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich to see their large collection of naval dirks.

Stag handle Scottish Highland Dirk, 19th centu…

Stag handle Scottish Highland Dirk, 19th century.

from The Kohl Collection

British 79th Cameron Highlanders Presentation …

British 79th Cameron Highlanders Presentation Dirk

A Georgian period Scottish officers dirk for the 79th Regiment Cameron Highlanders, the 35cm double blade blade with facet edge back is in very good condition. Ebonised baluster set with brass studs above a gilt mounts the front and rear with crossed swords and plumed hat, in original leather scabbard with gilt mounts which are engraved DMJ to JB , knife and fork en suite.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1879 Midshipma…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1879 Midshipman’s Dirk

45.5cm blade by Henry Wilkinson, Pall Mall, London, etched with scrolling foliage, crowned VR cypher and fouled anchor, regulation gilt brass hilt with lion’s head pommel, recurved quillons, wire bound fish skin covered grip, in its leather scabbard with engraved brass mounts, two opposing suspension rings, complete with knot of gold and blue bullion cord and acorn. 

Scottish dirk, knife, and fork set mounted wit…

Scottish dirk, knife, and fork set mounted with silver and cairngorm quartz. Produced by Leckie, Graham, and Co. Glasgow, mid 19th century.

from Auctions Imperial

victoriansword: A Scarce Variation of the 18…

victoriansword:

A Scarce Variation of the 1856 Pattern Midshipman’s Dirk

31cm blade 3.5cm wide at the forte, etched with scrolls, crowned VR cypher and fouled anchor, regulation gilt brass hilt with lion’s head pommel, the quillons with acorn terminals, wire bound fish skin grip, in its leather scabbard with engraved locket fitted with frog stud cast with foliage, and replacement chape.

Scottish Dirk, Early 18th Century The blade (some wear and…

Scottish Dirk, Early 18th Century

The blade (some wear and pitting) cut with a narrow fuller along the back on each side and double-edged over a third of its length to the point, slightly shouldered root wood hilt (split, some wear) carved with characteristic Celtic interlace, brass mount at its base secured by a pin on each side, and circular flat brass pommel-cap retained by a quatrefoil tang nut. 34.5 cm blade.