Category: 1st century ad

Roman Blue Glass Bird Bottle, 1st Century AD

Roman Blue Glass Bird Bottle, 1st Century AD

3.25 inches (8.23cm) high. Glass bottles of this type are identified as “gutti” and were used to dispense small quantities of wine or oil.

Roman Blue Glass Bird Bottle, 1st Century AD

Roman Blue Glass Bird Bottle, 1st Century AD

3.25 inches (8.23cm) high. Glass bottles of this type are identified as “gutti” and were used to dispense small quantities of wine or oil.

Roman Mosaic Glass Bowl, Eastern Mediterranean…

Roman Mosaic Glass Bowl, Eastern Mediterranean, Late 1st Century BC – 1st Century AD

Roman Gold Rimmed Rock Crystal Amphora, 1st-3r…

Roman Gold Rimmed Rock Crystal Amphora, 1st-3rd Century AD

A rock crystal vessel with faceted sidewall, chamfered shoulder, conical finial, two lateral right-angled handles; circular rim with applied gold sheath. 138 grams, 82mm (3 ¼")

Pliny the Elder in his Natural History, mentions a number of sources for rock crystal, such as Asia Minor, Cyprus, Portugal and the Alps, though he states the best came from India. The stone was fashioned into vessels in Bronze Age Greece as well as Cyprus, Asia Minor, Egypt and Mesopotamia. The use of rock crystal for vessels fell out of fashion in Classical Greece but was revived in the Hellenistic period where it was associated with the wealthy elite in such cities as Alexandria and Antioch.

In the Roman Empire rock crystal was highly valued and according to Pliny, Livia, the wife of Augustus, dedicated a block weighing one hundred and fifty pounds on the Capitol; he also mentions a wealthy Roman woman paying one hundred and fifty thousand sestertii for a single rock crystal dipper. Suetonius mentions that Nero had two crystal cups carved with Homeric scenes that he broke when he received the news that the Senate had called for his execution. The high value placed by the Romans on rock crystal can be seen in the high degree of carving that the surviving pieces have, and their relative rarity compared to other stone vessels.

Iridescent Roman Glass Unguentarium, 1st-3rd C…

Iridescent Roman Glass Unguentarium, 1st-3rd Century AD

4.5 inches (11.43cm) high

Egyptian Millefiori Glass Beads, Roman Period,…

Egyptian Millefiori Glass Beads, Roman Period, 1st Century BC/AD

Hellenistic Terracotta Group of a Hunter and h…

Hellenistic Terracotta Group of a Hunter and his Family, Signed by Apollonios, C. Early 1st Century AD

The young man, perhaps Meleager, standing in a relaxed attitude with his legs crossed, his right hand behind his back, resting his left hand on his wife’s shoulder, and wearing a chlamys fastened with a brooch on his right shoulder, a dog at his feet, the young woman seated on a rocky outcrop, looking up at her husband, holding a small boy on her lap, and wearing a himation loosely draped over a chiton falling from her right shoulder and leaving her breast bare, the child with Eros braid and clasping a pet(?) in his arms, the tall base decorated in relief with a hunter wearing a petasos and wielding his spear at a leaping boar, perhaps a depiction of Meleager killing the Calydonian Boar, the coropolast’s signature ΑΠΟΛΛΟΝΙΟΥ (“[the work] of Apollonios”) etched into the back prior to firing, remains of gesso and pigment. Height 21.7 cm.

Roman Gold Chain Bracelet, 1st-2nd Century AD

Roman Gold Chain Bracelet, 1st-2nd Century AD

Roman Carved Phallus, 1st Century ADCarved of white marble with…

Roman Carved Phallus, 1st Century AD

Carved of white marble with a figure grasping the shaft that can be interpreted as a representation of fertility.

Roman Balsamarium in the Form of a Celtic Aristocrat, 1st-2nd…

Roman Balsamarium in the Form of a Celtic Aristocrat, 1st-2nd Century AD

A bronze balsamarium in the form of a bust of a Celtic male with coils of lime-washed hair, handlebar mustache and closely cropped beard; eyes inlaid in silver; torc around neck with terminal inlaid in silver; hinge and loops to the top of the head, separate lid in the form of hair. 11cm

The Celtic tribes were divided into different classes or castes of hierarchical nobility. Their society was quite complex with a king or queen at the top of society and a warrior aristocracy below them, with merchants and peasants forming further subdivisions of society; the religious sect formed a separate class that was divided into Druids, Bards and Ovates and who not only dealt with religious matters but also formulated the laws. Classical authors, such as Caesar and Strabo, describe the Celtic aristocracy as dyeing their skin with blue paint and washing their hair in lime so that it formed spikes. Another feature of the aristocracy was the wearing of neck torcs, something that was only reserved for the royal family and the warrior aristocracy, as well as the gods, as it was seen to have divine connotations.