Category: 19th century

Baskethilt Broadsword Guard Design & Use…

Baskethilt Broadsword Guard Design & Use – With Jay Maas

victoriansword: Moro Warrior Wearing Plated Ma…

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Moro Warrior Wearing Plated Mail Armour and Holding a Barong

Although the source for this image claims Spanish influence on the armour, to me it is much closer to the Indo-Persian zirah baktar plated mail armour.

victoriansword: A  very large and rare Datu …

victoriansword:

very large and rare Datu Barong

This thick heavy fighting type measures approx 60 cm long from tip to tip. Its blade length is 40 cm long, 1 cm thick and 7.5 cm across the blade at the widest point. The large oversize pommel of Jungayan style is expertly formed and inlayed with Suassa alloys at the top. The grip section is woven and tarred cord, double wrapped and without loss or damage. The silver hilt tube is both inlaid and over-laid with suassa fittings. The blade is of the Shandigan type with clear hollow forging and very fine beveled cutting edge. Its surfaces display a very fine pattern welding with a clear Harmon like quality along the cutting edge. It is without its original sheath. A very rare and outstanding Barong from high nobility, one that remains in excellent condition for its age.

Beja Warrior Holding a Kaskara 

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Beja Warrior Holding a Kaskara 

victoriansword: A Rare Sudanese Kaskara Of S…

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A Rare Sudanese Kaskara Of Sultan Ali Dinar Ibn Zakariya And Given By Him To His Son Mazmal, 1884

Dated 1302 A.H. Corresponding To 1884 A.D.With broad double-edged blade (tip with some pitting) struck with a bladesmith’s mark within the shallow double fuller over half its length on each side and retaining traces of etched foliate decoration, the etched rectangular panel on one side inscribed ‘al-Sultan Ali Dinar son of al-Sultan Zakariya son of al-Sultan Mohammad al-Fadl son of al-Sultan Abdurzahman al-Rashid son of Sultan Ahmad Bakr, year 1216 A.H.’ (corresponding to 1801 A.D.), and on the other ‘This Sword was given by Sultan Ali Dinar to his son Mazmal’ followed by a repeat of the ancestral inscription above, all the inscriptions in naskh, characteristic hilt comprising brass tapering langets and cross guard of diamond section swelling towards the tips, the face of one tip inscribed ‘Sultan Ali Dinar Son of Sultan Zakariya’ and dated 1302 A.H. (corresponding to 1884 A.D.), and with the tughra of Ali Dinar on the other, silver-covered grip embossed with a pinecone design, and flat circular pommel with punched decoration and surmounted by a button on a dome, in its tooled leather scabbard (damaged, some losses) with characteristic swelling and embossed silver throat mount, steel suspension rings with leather strap, and twisted leather tassels. 91.5 cm blade.

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Antique Bamboo Sword Cane

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Antique Bamboo Sword Cane

victoriansword: This ring armor was taken by …

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This ring armor was taken by the Devon Yeomanry Battalion from the hut of the Khalifa, Abdallahi Ibn Muhammad, who replaced the Sudanese Mahdi and lead the Mahdists warriors against the British army in the battle of Omdurman, Sept. 1898. The ring armor is made of steel rings sewn with leather strips on a leather and heavy fabric back. 13 X 18 inches. Very good condition. Some of the leather strips are torn. Few rings missing and two rings loose. This armor was displayed in the Devon Yeomanry Museum.

The Logistics of the Crimean War Darrell Ri…

The Logistics of the Crimean War

Darrell Rivers & Brett Gibbons discuss the logistics of the Crimean War including the differences in British & French supply, transport, rationing, and ordnance, the Board of Ordnance, the issuing of green coffee, successes, failures, and the transition towards professional systems in the British and French armies in the 19th century.

victoriansword: Takouba, 19th century

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Takouba, 19th century

The takouba is a style of sword traditionally associated with the Tuareg, the nomadic people of the central and west-central areas of the Sahara desert (including portions of what is now Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, and Morocco). The sword typically has a broad, straight, double-edged blade averaging 74 to 84 cm. (29 to 33 inches) in length and a simple cross-guard, and resembles the medieval European sword. The blades are generally imported, many bearing the marks of Toledo (Spain) or Solingen (Germany).

The BRLSI example has a wide, double edged blade, 83cm in length and formed with three fullers. The blade is stamped with 2 “moon-face” marks on each side. The brass sheet crossbar is decorated with an engraved pattern and fixed with iron rivets. The mushroom-shaped pommel is engraved in a similar pattern while the grip is partly covered with leather. The leather scabbard is partly encased with brass sheet which form both a chape and a locket. The brass sheet is engraved with a decorative pattern and is also pierced, the leather beneath stained in red or green to form an attractive design.

Catalogue no: EW024

Persian Qajar Period Armour, 19th Century

Persian Qajar Period Armour, 19th Century

Comprising helmet (kulah khud), with hemispherical skull decorated over its surface with scrollwork cartouches inhabited by differing figures in traditional costume and the base encircled by calligraphic cartouches, fitted at its apex with a circular boss with associated pyramidal spike, a pair of plume-holders at the front, sliding nasal-bar with shaped terminals (retaining screw missing), mail neck-defence of butted links and with an early padded lining; shield (dhal) of shallow convex form, decorated en suite with the kulah khud, fitted with four domed bosses corresponding on the inside to four rings for enarmes (missing), brass rim, and with an early red lining; arm-defence (bazu band), of gutter-shaped form, decorated en suite with the preceding pieces retaining its two wrist plates attached by mail of butted links and with an early red lining the helmet: 34.0 cm; 13 3/8 in high.