Category: 1796

When you get hungry but the only thing you hav…

When you get hungry but the only thing you have to eat is a sword.

British Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officer’s S…

British Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officer’s Sword

89 cm plain blade, regulation pierced steel hilt, wire bound ribbed leather covered wooden grip, contained in its black painted steel scabbard.

British Flank / Light Infantry Officers Sabr…

British Flank / Light Infantry Officers Sabre, 1796 to 1803

This is a British interim sabre from between 1796 and 1803, for a Flank or Light Infantry officer. With a wedge section blade, heavily curved, and a 1796 style hilt, this sword was scaled down to fit the needs of an infantry officer and is extremely quick and agile.

The deeply curved, slightly shorter blade is well suited to draw cuts, and the overall lightness compliments the POB (12cm from crossguard)

The reason it can be accurately dated to the interim period of 1796 to 1803 is because of the British war office officially adopting new patterns of sabres in those years.

In 1796 the (rather well known) 1796 light cavalry sabre was adopted, which this mimics in hilt design, featuring a stirrup hilt (“P” shaped guard) and a curved blade.

Flank infantry and Light infantry officers often engaged in skirmishing tactics and thus officers for these regiments tended to go for more combat appropriate swords than their official pattern (The 1796 spadroon, often considered to be a terrible sword).

As a result of the number of Flank/Light infantry officers using 1796 Light Cavalry sabre derivatives, the 1803 was soon officially adopted for these regiments, featuring a broad, heavily curved blade and a more elaborate and more protective hilt.

This design falls between those two.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1796 Light Cav…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword

Wide, curved, single-and false-edged blade with large, central fuller, the base engraved with crowned, royal monogram, trophies and floral motifs on one side, and with royal coat-of-arms and motto “DIEU MON DROIT”; remains of gilding; iron, finished, mono-quillon hilt, leather-covered grip, with iron wire binding, faceted ring-nut; complete with scabbard with two suspension rings.

Royal Artillery Swords in the Napoleonic Era…

Royal Artillery Swords in the Napoleonic Era

A look at all the swords used by the British foot and horse artillery in the Napoleonic era. All swords shown are original antiques of the period.

victoriansword: British Pattern 1796 Light Ca…

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Style Officer’s Sword with an Indian Blade, Early 19th Century

The heavy deeply curved 80 cm blade of Indian workmanship cut with shallow double grooves to each side, struck with a single small armourers mark and engraved with a short inscription in Islamic script, copper-gilt hilt, 1796 style knuckle-guard, rounded langets, finely cast and chased pommel in the form of a lions head, faceted back-strap, fish-skin covered grip bound with copper wire.

For your 18th Century to early 19th Century ad…

For your 18th Century to early 19th Century adventures.

victoriansword: British Officer’s Sabre, c.180…

victoriansword:

British Officer’s Sabre, c.1800

This pattern 1796 style sabre was popular with officers of infantry regiments, the Royal Navy, and the yeomanry and the militia. Without decoration or markings it is impossible to say with certainty which arm of the military used this particular example. 

victoriansword: British Pattern 1796 Infantry …

victoriansword:

British Pattern 1796 Infantry Officer’s Sword

The Pattern 1796 Infantry Officer’s Sword was the successor to the Pattern 1786 sword (which was really just a blade pattern and officers could choose whatever hilt they wished). The hilt of the P1796 was based on a Continental pattern which had been in existence for some time–a gilt brass guard and knuckle bow with silver wire (sometimes sheet silver) wrapped grip. The blades are generally 1 inch wide at the ricasso and approximately 31-32 inches long and decorated in some manner (etching or blue & gilt, for example). This pattern was in service until 1822 when a new infantry sword pattern was introduced. For an outstanding article on British swords of the period, please see “The British Officer’s Sword 1776-1815” by David Critchley.

This example was cleaned vigorously throughout its 200 year life and no decoration or maker name remains. The gilt is almost completely gone from the brass hilt. The grip is a wood core with silver sheet wrap to simulate wire. The guard is hinged on the inside portion so that when it is folded it will not damage the wearer’s uniform.

This is a pattern which would have been carried by British infantry officers at the Battle of Waterloo.

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officer’s S…

British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officer’s Sword

A 1796 pattern light cavalry officer’s sword, broad, curved, shallow fullererd blade 32½”, etched and blued and gilt for two thirds length with crowned 1801-16 Royal Arms with supporters and motto, trophy of arms, etc, and Union spray, on one side, and on the other with crowned GR cypher, trophy of instruments etc, mounted horseman and flourishes, steel stirrup hilt with crossguard and langets, pronounced knucklebow, plain forward sloping pommel and backstrap, ribbed fishskin grip, in its steel scabbard.