Author: Lock, Stock, and History

Regular

theancientwayoflife:

~ Plate with court scene.

Date: A.D. 650–800

Culture/People: Late Classic Maya

Medium: Earthenware and pigment

armthearmour: A lovely Cane Sword, Morocco, ca…

armthearmour:

A lovely Cane Sword, Morocco, ca. 20th century, from Czerny’s International Auction House.

Japanese kaiken dagger, late 18th century.

Japanese kaiken dagger, late 18th century.

from Auctions Imperial

peashooter85: Henri Lecorre’s Rosalie, Henri L…

peashooter85:

Henri Lecorre’s Rosalie,

Henri Lecorre was a World War I French Canadian soldier who joined 22nd Battalion of the Canadian Army on April 14th, 1915.  When Lecorre was issued his Lee Enfield No. 1 Mark III bolt action rifle, he christened the rifle “Rosalie” but carving the name on the stock along with his unit number. As the war waged, Lecorre carved the names of the many battles he participated in and survived, most notably Vimy Ridge, Arras, and Passchendaele. When a commanding officer discovered what Lacorre was doing to the rifle, he had Lacorre thrown in the stockade and fined for “defacing the King’s property”. The rifle was confiscated and slated to be destroyed, however a civilian scrap dealer recovered the rifle and returned it to Lacorre. The rifle was lost again after being stolen, but when Lacorre learned it was on display at a French tavern, he posed as a military policeman and reclaimed the rifle. Once again the rifle was discovered by a superior officer and ordered destroyed, however Lacorre fooled the authorities by carving another rifle and having that rifle sent to be scrapped.

Henri Lecorre lost Rosalie for good near the end of the war when he was seriously wounded. He was sent to a field hospital, but the rifle never went with him. Rosalie was recovered at the battlefield and sent to the Royal Small Arms factory as a historic piece. In 1943, during World War II, the rifle was presented to Canadian Gen. Andrew McNaughton, who returned the rifle to the Royal 22nd Battalion. Eventually Rosalie was put on display at the La Citadelle de Quebec museum. 

In 1956 Henri Lecorre visited the museum, and to his surprise recognized his Rosalie on display.Henri Lecorre passed away in 1963.

A high definition picture of Rosalie can be found in the link below.

http://gigapan.com/gigapans/56127

peashooter85: Knife associated with Tlingit …

peashooter85:

Knife associated with Tlingit Chief Shakes, ca. 1840–1890, Etolin Island, Alaska. 

Made from iron, brass, ivory, abalone, caribou hide, wool cloth, cotton cloth, glass beads, dentalium shell.

historyarchaeologyartefacts:

historyarchaeologyartefacts:

Insignia (Globus cruciger: gold, diamonds, pearls, rubies, sapphires) of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor, 1612[1061×1564]

historyarchaeologyartefacts:

historyarchaeologyartefacts:

Portrait of the Emperor Caracalla carved in amethyst, ~212CE. [664×908]

Regular

cazador-red:

I think the Renault FT-17 is the ultimate tank

What I mean by ultimate is not the best tank but it’s the tank that defined what it meant to be a tank. It also had an incredibly long service life and actually still showed up in modern times but that will be at the end of this post. The French FT-17 was a two man tank that was the first one with a turret. Originally having a machine gun and later versions had a cannon it was very under powered by WWII standards in the engine and gun. It couldn’t go much faster than a brisk walking pace and it was not heavily armored but it really set the bar for how tanks should be developed from then on. Earlier landship behemoths like the ones fielded by the British and Germans were simply outclassed by this smaller and more nimble tank in terms of maneuverability and capability. It’s the old Monitor vs the Merrimack scenario where you have two ships with very different approaches. The Monitor smaller, had a lower silhouette and had one turret with two guns. The Merrimack had guns on both sides and the front and back but the Monitor was superior in that it could shoot from any angle and offered a smaller target to hit. The same with the FT-17. It could shoot from any angle and it offered a much smaller target to the enemy. The subsequent development of American, Czech, German, British, French, Swedish, Japanese and Russian turreted tanks all can trace their lineage back to the FT-17.

The last known combat action of the FT-17 was in the 1980′s in Afghanistan. It had been captured by the Germans and pressed into secondary service during WWII and after the war several ended up in Afghanistan where they served more or less as pillboxes against the Soviets. That’s still a combat life spanning nearly 70 years. Every once in awhile they still find hulks of them in places like Syria and Iraq. 

The FT-17 was not the best, it just pointed the development of armor in the right direction.  

armthearmour: A Shamshir with a hilt made enti…

armthearmour:

A Shamshir with a hilt made entirely of gold and enameled, India, Jaipur, hilt ca. 18th century, blade ca. 17th century, housed at the Wallace Collection.

ancient-serpent:

ancient-serpent:

Gold bracelet, embossed and engraved, with niello, blue glazed quartzite, garnets, sapphires and turquoises, Iran, 1100-1200, V&A Museum