Author: Lock, Stock, and History

peashooter85: A Shovel with a Hole in it — The…

peashooter85:

A Shovel with a Hole in it — The MacAdam Shield Shovel,

One of the great Canadian inventions in history, the MacAdam Shield Shovel was an interesting tool designed to give Canadian soldiers extra protection while fighting in the trenches of World War I.  Invented by Ena MacAdams, secretary to Canadian Defense Minister Sam Hughes, the MacAdam shield shovel was intended to be used both as a tradition shovel and as a piece of armor for the soldiers. The shovel was made from 3/16ths of an inch thick steel and had a 3.5×2 inch hole in it.  

The handle was detachable and revealed a spike which was to be driven into the ground. The shovel’s hole served a port through which a soldier inserted the muzzle of his rifle, the hole being just large enough for the soldier to have a small sight picture, and thus the soldier could fire from prone while the shovel would deflect enemy bullets.

Unfortunately the MacAdam shield shovel made neither a good shield nor a good shovel..  Despite being made of thicker steel it was incapable of sufficiently deflecting bullets.  Due to it’s extra weight it became a nuisance to carry and was harder to wield as a shovel.  Finally, it made a terrible shovel for the same reason that a spoon with a large hole in it would make a terrible soup spoon.

24,000 shield shovels were produced, most being ditched by Canadian soldiers shortly after arrival in Europe. The shield shovel project was discontinued, and most shovels were collected and sold for scrap metal.

theancientwayoflife: ~ Plaque: Athena’s Head. …

theancientwayoflife:

~ Plaque: Athena’s Head.
Date: Mid-4th century B.C.
Place of origin: Krasnodar Territory, Taman Peninsula
Archaeological site: Bolshaya Bliznitsa barrow
Medium: Gold, silver

grandegyptianmuseum: Head of an ibex from …

grandegyptianmuseum:

Head of an ibex from a sacred barque. Third Intermediate Period,

21st Dynasty, ca. 1069-945 BC. Bronze with gold. Now in the Neues Museum, Berlin.

One Hit Wonderland — “I’m Too Sexy” by R…

One Hit Wonderland — “I’m Too Sexy” by Right Said Fred

from Todd in the Shadows

theancientwayoflife: ~ Kalathos Headdress/ Com…

theancientwayoflife:

~ Kalathos Headdress/ Combat between the Arimaspos and the Gryphons.
Date: 4th century B.C.
Place of origin: Krasnodar Territory, Taman Peninsula, near the Cossack Village of Vyshestebliyevskaya
Archaeological site: Great Bliznitsa barrow, stone crypt No.1
Medium: Gold

New York engraved, gold and silver plated Colt…

New York engraved, gold and silver plated Colt Model 1862 cartridge conversion revolver.

from Rock Island Auctions

Regular

theancientwayoflife:

~Pair of gold earrings with an Egyptian Atef crown set with stones and glass.

Period: Hellenistic

Date: 3rd–2nd century B.C.

Culture: Greek

Medium: Gold with stone and glass

Szyszak parade helmet, Polish, Hungarian, or R…

Szyszak parade helmet, Polish, Hungarian, or Russian, 17th century.

from Auctions Imperial

Regular

theancientwayoflife:

~ Pair of ear pendants with Erotes.

Cukture: Greek

Date: 2nd–1st century B.C.

Medium: Gold, garnet, granulation

peashooter85: A Shovel with a Hole in it — Th…

peashooter85:

A Shovel with a Hole in it — The MacAdam Shield Shovel,

One of the great Canadian inventions in history, the MacAdam Shield Shovel was an interesting tool designed to give Canadian soldiers extra protection while fighting in the trenches of World War I.  Invented by Ena MacAdams, secretary to Canadian Defense Minister Sam Hughes, the MacAdam shield shovel was intended to be used both as a tradition shovel and as a piece of armor for the soldiers. The shovel was made from 3/16ths of an inch thick steel and had a 3.5×2 inch hole in it.  

The handle was detachable and revealed a spike which was to be driven into the ground. The shovel’s hole served a port through which a soldier inserted the muzzle of his rifle, the hole being just large enough for the soldier to have a small sight picture, and thus the soldier could fire from prone while the shovel would deflect enemy bullets.

Unfortunately the MacAdam shield shovel made neither a good shield nor a good shovel..  Despite being made of thicker steel it was incapable of sufficiently deflecting bullets.  Due to it’s extra weight it became a nuisance to carry and was harder to wield as a shovel.  Finally, it made a terrible shovel for the same reason that a spoon with a large hole in it would make a terrible soup spoon.

24,000 shield shovels were produced, most being ditched by Canadian soldiers shortly after arrival in Europe. The shield shovel project was discontinued, and most shovels were collected and sold for scrap metal.