laflenkenway: victoriansword: victorianswor…

laflenkenway:

victoriansword:

victoriansword:

U.S. Model 1904 Bolo Knife

Broad 12 inch blade marked U.S./34230 and SA/1913 with ordnance grenade. Brass-mounted grip. Brass-mounted leather scabbard with suspension loop. Reverse of scabbard with inspector’s initials and marked Rock Island/Arsenal/1912/H.E.K.

@pineapplepantsart  The 1904 Bolo was designed for the Hospital Corps, so it probably wasn’t meant to be a fighting knife. According to The Springfield Edge; 

The M-1904 Hospital Corps Knife was the first of the modern Springfield Armory made edged weapons to carry a serial number. Designed for use by the U. S. Army Medical Corps, over 40,000 Hospital Corps Knives were made at the Springfield Armory, Springfield, MA between 1904 and 1914, however, none have been found with the 1906 date. According to archive correspondence, the first 236 knives were issued without serial numbers, but at the request of the Surgeon General of the U.S. Army, the Springfield Armory began the serial numbering process with number 237 and continuing upward. Previously issued knives were recalled for numbering, but a very small number of knives without serial numbers have survived. The lowest known serial number is 264. Contrary to many stories, the knife was not designed for “field expedient amputations”, but the look in the novice’s eyes often make the tale worth the telling.

It was actually designed for making splints and casts. The wide, spatulated tip made a good tool for spreading plaster over a cast without risking accidentally stabbing the patient and the broad, heavy blade made for easy cutting of saplings for splints and litters.