victoriansword:

British Chest of Arms, c.1830

Made by Woolley, Sargant and Fairfax. Pine Chest containing twelve flintlock musketoons, pistols, bayonets and cutlasses

Photo from the Butterfield & Butterfield auction catalog for the Charles Bremner Hogg Jackson bequest to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in October of 1996, and now in the collection of the Royal Armouries in Leeds.

cartespostalesantiques:

Guerrero
Italian Theatre Star

Vintage postcard

So what? You think I feel good? Nobody feels good! After childhood it’s a fact of life! I feel rotten! So what? I don’t let it bother me! I don’t let interfere with my job!

American Panascope, Home of the Rectal Probe

are burritos sandwiches

What no

are burritos sandwiches

What no

Bronze sword, Central Europe, 12th Century BC

from Karabela Auctions

Blackfoot dagger with beaded hid sheath, 19th century.

from Sotheby’s

tlatollotl:

K’iché burial or cache urn base

Maya
Late Classic Period
A.D. 650–850

Object Place: K’iche, Guatemala, Southern Highlands

The base of this burial or cache urn is decorated with a modeled and painted rendering of a scroll-eyed saurian with widely opened mouth. From its maw emerges an anthropomorphic supernatural being with scroll eyes, protruding canine teeth, and a long snout-like nose with an up-curved element attached to the nose bridge. Jaguar ears are found above his circular ear flares. He wears a thin headband decorated with four appliquéd disks, and two small human arms emerge from under his chin. Two vertical flanges flank the urn’s sides, each decorated with two modeled and painted human heads whose long flowing hair may indicate they are war trophy heads. The body of the urn is painted red with black jaguar-like spots.

This lid’s figure has the cropped hair and T-shaped tooth of a solar deity. The meaning of the enigmatic supernatural emerging from the Xoc creature and the rows of humanoid heads remain mysterious, reminding us how little is known of Classic Maya religion.

MFA

Ceremonial Russian saber dated 1748.

from The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg